Upskirt

Panty fetish web site.
Source: Upskirt Sniper
See also: Panty fetishism

Upskirt is a slang term usually referring to up skirt photography, images of the view up a woman's skirt (as seen from underneath), including shots of a woman's underwear, or exposing her vulva or buttocks. Alternatively, an "upskirt" may be a video, an illustration, or simply a view.

Upskirt photographs are common on pornographic websites.[1]

Voyeurism

While upskirt images may be captured consensually, many viewers seek such images taken surreptitiously (and presumably without the subject's consent). The creation and viewing of this type of upskirt are a form of voyeurism. The advent of cell phones fitted with cameras (a.k.a. camera phones) is often credited for the surge in this type of photograph.[2][3]

Legal consideration

Australia

Many states in Australia have passed laws making it illegal to take upskirt photos in public places without the subject's Consent.[4]

Japan

Further information: panchira

In Japan, hidden-camera photography itself is not against the law as of 2002; however, distributing such photos publicly may break the law. Camera phones sold in Japan make an audible noise when taking a picture.[5] This feature makes the subject more likely to notice if clandestine upskirt photos are being taken without consent.

New Zealand

In New Zealand it is illegal to take voyeuristic photos of intimate body parts in any setting in which a person has a "reasonable expectation of privacy". This includes public and private settings. It is also illegal to possess or distribute such images.[6]

United States

Upskirt images have also been a driving force behind a wave of state, local, and Federal legislation that began around the year 2000, shortly after the introduction and subsequent widespread proliferation of camera phones.
Detail from Fragonard's The Swing (1767)
Detail from Fragonard's The Swing (1767)

References

1. ^ O'Hagan, Maureen (20 September 2002). "'Upskirt' photographs deemed lewd but legal", The Seattle Times, The Seattle Times Company. Retrieved on 26 December 2006. "So-called "upskirt cams," sometimes called "upskirt photos" or "upskirt voyeur pictures," are a hot commodity in the world of Internet pornography."
2. ^ Napolitano, Jo (11 December 2003). "Hold It Right There, And Drop That Camera", The New York Times, The New York Times Company. Retrieved on 23 May 2008. "... the proliferation of camera phones had helped give new life to "up skirt" or "down blouse" photography."
3. ^ Tsai, Michael (18 January 2004). "Privacy issues plague picture phones", The Honolulu Advertiser, Gannett Co.. Retrieved on 26 December 2006. "... because of the growing popularity of camera-equipped cell phones."
4. ^ "Upskirting to become a crime". smh.com.au. The Sydney Morning Herald (28 July 2006). Retrieved on 10 June 2007. “Voyeurs who secretly take pictures up women's skirts or down their blouses will face a crackdown under draft uniform national laws criminalising the practice.”
5. ^ Tanikawa, Miki (9 September 2002). "In Japan, phones make mischief". International Herald Tribune. International Herald Tribune. Retrieved on 10 June 2007. “Mindful of such dangers, mobile network operators such as J-Phone have set up the phones so that releasing the shutter causes the phone to emit words like "Cheese!" or "Click!" Still, the sound may not be noticed in noisy public places...”
6. ^ "Law to stop voyeurs filming people". NZ Herald. APN Holdings NZ Limited (25 October 2006). Retrieved on 10 June 2007. “The punishment can be up to three years' imprisonment.”

 

| more